Complete Book Home Organization

A great book with a lot of helpful hints! The beginning of the year is the best time to think about organizing now that the holidays have come and gone. By starting to organize your home you are able to control mental well-being and in turn have some peace of mind. 

"Have you ever wished you had the time and tools to organize your house in a clutter-free, design-conscious, Pinterest-worthy way? From storage solutions and cleaning tips to secret space-saving methods and expert strategies, The Complete Book of Home Organization is packed with the tips and shortcuts you need to effectively organize your home."

Nourishing Minimalism Challenge 2017!

Join the challenge put on by nourishingminimalism.com and receive a free Decluttering Chart!

"Each year, this blog hosts a decluttering challenge to get rid of the same number of items as the year. In 2017 everyone who joins the challenge will get rid of 2017 items from their homes. 24,440 people have signed up to do the challenge in years past..."

 

The Secret Life of an Organiser - Anonymous

I clear my clients’ physical and emotional clutter.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/aug/15/secret-life-of-an-organiser-clearing-clutter

"My day is busy from dawn until dawn, installing pretty containers, colour-blocking books within designer spaces and folding socks, Marie Kondo style. I wish. Professional organising is in actual fact dirty, physical – and disappointingly almost never involves styling."

Clutter Control

Clutter Control: Is Too Much 'Stuff' Draining You?

Get your clutter under control, and your attitude and health just may improve, too.

By Kathleen Doheny
WebMD Feature

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

WebMD Feature Archive

Clutter, Defined

What one person calls clutter another calls collections or treasures, so the first step is to figure out what qualifies as clutter. "Other people can't decide what is clutter for you," says Cynthia Townley Ewer of Richland, Wash., the editor of the web site Organized Home.

Peter Walsh, an organizational expert and former host of The Learning Channel's Clean Sweep show, divides clutter into two general types. "Memory" clutter is stuff that reminds us of important events, like old school programs or newspaper clippings. "Someday" clutter refers to items you won't toss because you feel you might need them someday.

"It's about balance," Walsh says of clutter control. "If you have so much stuff it drags you into the past or pulls you into the future, you can't live in the present."

Entire Article: http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/clutter-control

A Book About Junk

Junk: Digging Through America's Love Affair with Stuff Hardcover – April 1, 2016

by Alison Stewart (Author)

"Junk has become ubiquitous in America today. Who doesn’t have a basement, attic, closet, or storage unit filled with stuff too good to throw away? Or, more accurately, stuff you think is too good to throw away.

When journalist and author Alison Stewart was confronted with emptying her late parents’ overloaded basement, a job that dragged on for months, it got her thinking: How did it come to this? Why do smart, successful people hold on to old Christmas bows, chipped knick-knacks, VHS tapes, and books they would likely never reread? She discovered she was not alone."

Deep Clutter

A Clutter Too Deep for Mere Bins and Shelves

by Tara Parker-Pope

Read the article here:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/health/01well.html?_r=0

"Excessive clutter and disorganization are often symptoms of a bigger health problem. People who have suffered an emotional trauma or a brain injuryoften find housecleaning an insurmountable task. Attention deficit disorder, depression, chronic pain and grief can prevent people from getting organized or lead to a buildup of clutter. At its most extreme, chronic disorganization is called hoarding, a condition many experts believe is a mental illness in its own right, although psychiatrists have yet to formally recognize it.

Compulsive hoarding is defined, in part, by clutter that so overtakes living, dining and sleeping spaces that it harms the person’s quality of life. A compulsive hoarder finds it impossible, even painful, to part with possessions. It’s not clear how many people suffer from compulsive hoarding, but estimates start at about 1.5 million Americans."

2016 Decluttering Challenge

"Setting up daily habits is the turning point in keeping a clean home: it will take you from messy and overwhelmed to capable and confident. It will be a pleasure to invite people over and make contentment with your surroundings possible. That, dear friends, is freedom. Jumpstart Your Decluttering Now"

http://nourishingminimalism.com/2015/12/2016-in-2016-decluttering-challenge.html

The Story of Stuff

"We have a problem with Stuff. With just 5 percent of the world’s population, we’re consuming 30 percent of the world’s resources and creating 30 percent of the world’s waste. If everyone consumed at U.S. rates, we would need three to five planets. This alarming fact drove Annie Leonard to create the Internet film sensation The Story of Stuff, which has been viewed more than 30 million times by people around the world."

The Way We Live: Drowning in Stuff

Anthony P. Graesch was part of a team researching family life. Photos from a book he co-authored illustrate typical household abundance. CreditC.M. Glover for The New York Times

By:  Penelope Green

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/06/28/garden/an-anthropologist-on-hyper-abundance-and-the-american-home.html

Clear the Clutter: Organization Boosts Health and Vitality

Maria Modale - CEO & Chairman of Rodale, Inc. 

"We are all products of our environments, and vice versa, since the environments we create reflect and affect our physical, mental, and emotional health. When life becomes messy or disorderly, our physical as well as mental/emotional health can also get muddled and we become less energetic and less efficient."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/maria-rodale/clear-the-clutter-organiz_b_1341301.html

Letting Go Of Things - A Personal Story

I had a life changing event last year, my husband passed away of cancer, and while I had to deal with all the emotional challenges that came along with this change I had a very short time to downsize as I had to move from our home. This required that I tap into my organizing expertise but this time for myself.

I had a process and I felt it important to share what I did in hopes it can help those that have found their way to Healthy Organizing. We are all attached to "stuff" and letting go isn't easy but it is inevitable, as what you leave behind someone else will have to eventually let go of. The sooner you let go, the better you will feel.

These are the steps I took to let go:

1.  I donated all medical supplies and devices to a medical clinic as they use what they are able and rest are shipped to countries in need.

2,  I donated items such as hats, jackets, pants, shorts, shoes and socks to a local charity that serves the homeless.

3.  We lived in a central part of San Francisco so I was able to put household and kitchen items on the street as this is common practice and tends to be picked up quickly,  

4.  My husband was chef which meant he had a large collection of cookbooks. I decided to donate the majority of the cookbooks to a culinary institute as the students benefit greatly from these books as they usually cannot afford them while in school. 

5.  For what remained, with the help of friends, I established what it was I wanted to keep and what I thought would make cherished gifts for family and friends. 

I have worked with many clients who have lost loved ones so I have spent many hours in attics, garages and storage units and while it seems impossible to let go of these things it feels lighter once you do. This process will not only benefit you but it benefits many others as well.