Clutter Control

Clutter Control: Is Too Much 'Stuff' Draining You?

Get your clutter under control, and your attitude and health just may improve, too.

By Kathleen Doheny
WebMD Feature

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

WebMD Feature Archive

Clutter, Defined

What one person calls clutter another calls collections or treasures, so the first step is to figure out what qualifies as clutter. "Other people can't decide what is clutter for you," says Cynthia Townley Ewer of Richland, Wash., the editor of the web site Organized Home.

Peter Walsh, an organizational expert and former host of The Learning Channel's Clean Sweep show, divides clutter into two general types. "Memory" clutter is stuff that reminds us of important events, like old school programs or newspaper clippings. "Someday" clutter refers to items you won't toss because you feel you might need them someday.

"It's about balance," Walsh says of clutter control. "If you have so much stuff it drags you into the past or pulls you into the future, you can't live in the present."

Entire Article: http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/clutter-control

Deep Clutter

A Clutter Too Deep for Mere Bins and Shelves

by Tara Parker-Pope

Read the article here:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/health/01well.html?_r=0

"Excessive clutter and disorganization are often symptoms of a bigger health problem. People who have suffered an emotional trauma or a brain injuryoften find housecleaning an insurmountable task. Attention deficit disorder, depression, chronic pain and grief can prevent people from getting organized or lead to a buildup of clutter. At its most extreme, chronic disorganization is called hoarding, a condition many experts believe is a mental illness in its own right, although psychiatrists have yet to formally recognize it.

Compulsive hoarding is defined, in part, by clutter that so overtakes living, dining and sleeping spaces that it harms the person’s quality of life. A compulsive hoarder finds it impossible, even painful, to part with possessions. It’s not clear how many people suffer from compulsive hoarding, but estimates start at about 1.5 million Americans."

Spend less on stuff, more on experiences

stuff.jpg

 By James Wallman

"Surely we’ve had enough of materialism? There has to be more to life, so let’s try experientialism instead."

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/feb/27/spend-less-on-stuff-experiences-materialism-experientialism

"First, I read some research by two psychologists at UCLA, Rena Repetti and Darby Saxbe, which shows that too much stuff, and the stress that comes with all that stuff, is really bad for your health. Second, I came across another study, by another pair of psychologists, Leaf van Boven and Tom Gilovich, that proves experiences are more likely than material goods to lead to happiness."