Complete Book Home Organization

A great book with a lot of helpful hints! The beginning of the year is the best time to think about organizing now that the holidays have come and gone. By starting to organize your home you are able to control mental well-being and in turn have some peace of mind. 

"Have you ever wished you had the time and tools to organize your house in a clutter-free, design-conscious, Pinterest-worthy way? From storage solutions and cleaning tips to secret space-saving methods and expert strategies, The Complete Book of Home Organization is packed with the tips and shortcuts you need to effectively organize your home."

Get the Closet of Your Dreams - 6 Tips

"We reached out to Kendra Stanley, founder of Healthy Oganizing—an organization aimed to help people achieve their personal goals by decluttering their spaces—and she gave us six essential tips for creating the perfect closet space."

Read the entire article here on Sweet High.

https://www.sweetyhigh.com/read/closet-organization-tips-081716

Clutter Control

Clutter Control: Is Too Much 'Stuff' Draining You?

Get your clutter under control, and your attitude and health just may improve, too.

By Kathleen Doheny
WebMD Feature

Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD

WebMD Feature Archive

Clutter, Defined

What one person calls clutter another calls collections or treasures, so the first step is to figure out what qualifies as clutter. "Other people can't decide what is clutter for you," says Cynthia Townley Ewer of Richland, Wash., the editor of the web site Organized Home.

Peter Walsh, an organizational expert and former host of The Learning Channel's Clean Sweep show, divides clutter into two general types. "Memory" clutter is stuff that reminds us of important events, like old school programs or newspaper clippings. "Someday" clutter refers to items you won't toss because you feel you might need them someday.

"It's about balance," Walsh says of clutter control. "If you have so much stuff it drags you into the past or pulls you into the future, you can't live in the present."

Entire Article: http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/features/clutter-control

Deep Clutter

A Clutter Too Deep for Mere Bins and Shelves

by Tara Parker-Pope

Read the article here:  http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/01/health/01well.html?_r=0

"Excessive clutter and disorganization are often symptoms of a bigger health problem. People who have suffered an emotional trauma or a brain injuryoften find housecleaning an insurmountable task. Attention deficit disorder, depression, chronic pain and grief can prevent people from getting organized or lead to a buildup of clutter. At its most extreme, chronic disorganization is called hoarding, a condition many experts believe is a mental illness in its own right, although psychiatrists have yet to formally recognize it.

Compulsive hoarding is defined, in part, by clutter that so overtakes living, dining and sleeping spaces that it harms the person’s quality of life. A compulsive hoarder finds it impossible, even painful, to part with possessions. It’s not clear how many people suffer from compulsive hoarding, but estimates start at about 1.5 million Americans."

13 Essential Items To Donate

Mashable

13 essential items you never thought to donate to those in need

By Katie Dupere

"Giving back is important, but all those canned pineapples and piles of forgotten T-shirts aren't really doing the trick.

Take Hurricane Sandy as an example: When the superstorm hit the northeastern United States in October 2012, clothing donations flooded into relief areas across the region. Only, clothing wasn't what people needed in the storm's aftermath. Sandy survivors needed flashlights, batteries, supplies to stay warm — not old high school T-shirts donors found in the backs of their closets. Much of the donated clothing was tossed aside to give more attention to the donations people could actually use.

The lesson: We have to fill a need we actually see."

http://mashable.com/2015/06/09/items-to-donate-unexpected/

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